Neighborhoods.nyc @ Queens Borough Hall

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From our friends at Coalition For Queens…


Hi all,

We wanted to extend an invitation for nonprofits and local development corporations to attend a Neighborhoods.NYC info session on Wednesday, Dec. 2 from 9:30-11AM at Queens Borough Hall, 120-55 Queens Boulevard, Kew Gardens, NY, Room 200. You can register here. The session will provide information for organizations interested in applying to license and operate a specific neighborhood domain name (e.g., KewGardens.nyc). The City of New York has reserved nearly 400 neighborhood names across the five boroughs on the .nyc top-level domain, and these neighborhood domains will be new online hubs for civic engagement, online organizing, economic development, and information-sharing. A beta site is currently live for you to explore the platform.

To be eligible for a .nyc neighborhood name, the lead organization must be:

  • registered as a not-for-profit, public benefit corporation, or local development corporation
  • located within the neighborhood for which a .nyc domain name is sought

If your organization is interested in applying, please RSVP for the info session next Wednesday Dec. 2. The RSVP deadline is Nov. 30. Download this flyer (.5MB, PDF) for more details, and you can reach out to [email protected] with any questions.>
Thanks and have a wonderful holiday!

~C4Q


For some background on neighborhoods.nyc see here.

Hope to see you there.

Editor

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Introducing the NYCommons

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Jackson Hts., New York, March 12, 2015 – Yesterday I received an invitation from Peter H. Kostmayer, CEO of Citizens Committee for New York City to a most interesting meeting taking place this evening. Here’s the invite:

I’m writing to invite you to a meeting and introduce NYCommons, a project of the Urban Justice Center, Common Cause New York, and the Fund for Public Advocacy.

NYCommons is in the planning stages, and they would like your input to help shape a citywide coalition to influence policy making around how the city deals with its public assets.

One of the goals of the project is to provide local stakeholders with tools needed to impact decisions around the future of their parks, libraries, community gardens, housing and other publicly held spaces.  By creating accessible information about who controls these public assets, how decisions about the properties are made, and how members of the public can influence these choices, NYCommons seeks to build a coalition to help communities raise their voices to ensure that local people will continue to enjoy the benefits of shared space for generations to come. Together we will develop a citywide framework to address the issues raised by decisions affecting future use of public places.

As a New Yorker I have a vital interest in knowing “who controls these public assets, how decisions about the properties are made, and how members of the public can influence these choices” and will be there tonight. And I’ll be stressing the need to add .nyc to the list of commons resources.

For some background see our Public Spaces page on our wiki.

The meeting’s tonight, March 12, from 6:30-8 at the Urban Justice Center, 123 William Street (16th Floor), Downtown Manhattan. For more on the event see here.

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2015 – The Year of the dotNeighborhoods

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neighborhoodJackson Hts., New York, January 18, 2015 – One of the unheralded achievements of the de Blasio administration’s first year was saving the neighborhood domain names – Astoria.nyc, Bensonhurst.nyc, Chelsea.nyc, etc. from the auction block. Under Bloomberg, these historic names were slotted to be sold off during the Landrush period to whoever had the biggest bank account. But under the guidance of Mayor de Blasio’s Sr. Adviser Jeff Merritt, the names were reserved:

The City of New York has reserved roughly 400 neighborhood names for use by community groups to develop new online hubs for civic engagement, online organizing and information-sharing. Neighborhood names will be available beginning in Fall 2014 and will be licensed to community groups through a competitive application process.

In order to be eligible for a .nyc neighborhood name, the lead organization must meet the following minimum qualifications: (a) registered as a not-for-profit, public benefit corporation or local development corporation, and (b) located within the neighborhood for which a .nyc domain name is sought.

Neighborhoods have been a long-time focus of ours. (See our dotNeighborhood wiki pages.) We’ve imagined vast unrealized social and civic potential, hamstrung by inadequate communication. Our most noticeable involvements with them was a collaboration with the New York Internet Society and Wikimedia-NY that explored the potential of neighborhood wikis. (See NYCwiki.org). So we were delighted by this development.

Over the next year a considerable part of our efforts will focus on making the most of these dotNeighborhoods. We hope to plan a pilot project with the following components:

  • Organizing – Write an on the ground plan for ways to engage local residents and organizations to support the venture. This will include ways to determine local training needs and integration with existing entities – digital and traditional.
  • Technology – Create a system with five components:
    • Centrally gathered neighborhood data: demographics, maps, economic info, government programs and grant information. Here we will look to collaborate with the city administration and entities such as Beta-NY.
    • A host system that includes a wiki component enabling everyone to record and publish a neighborhood’s memory. (For example, see Davis Wiki.)
    • Features that support discussion, decision making, and organizing.
    • An app for engagement while roaming the streets, with 311, service reviews, and peer connections.
    • A business model.
  • Best Practices – Establish a process for sharing ideas with other neighborhoods.

We invite the many who’ve indicated supported for our dotNeighborhoods initiative to limber up their minds and/or fingers and get ready for a most exciting year. Those who do not receive our dotNeighborhood notices should sign-up using the form at the lower left below.

NOTE 1: A paper on city neighborhood names was presented at a November 2015 “The City As A Commons” conference in Bologna, Italy by Connecting.nyc Inc.’s Thomas Lowenhaupt. See it here.

Note 2: We’ve published a series of pags on dotNeighborhoods. See them here.

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Neighborhood Building

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map with neighborhood namesJackson Hts., New York, August 21, 2014 – One of most promising developments to come out of city hall with regard to the .nyc TLD is the reservation of the neighborhood names. In the mayor’s press release of August 4 he announced that nearly 400 of them had been set aside for development by public interest groups. Already a licensing agreement has been drafted and an application process established.

What’s next? There are plans to use the neighborhoods.nyc domain name as a repository for local data, features, services, and expertise that can assist with residents with the development of their neighborhood names. And a conference on using technology to develop neighborhoods in the early planning stage.

While we’re waiting for those resources to be realized, it might be good to do some fundamental thinking about the nature of a neighborhood. What do neighborhoods do? And what might digital neighborhoods do? What role does digital technology play with neighborhood formation and development? And will digital capacity enlarge or shrink the footprint of a neighborhood? We’ve some wiki pages on these topics here.

(Note: A meeting on Neighborhood Building was held on August 22. The bullet points are available in Comment 1 to this post.)

 

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