Maps.nyc

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Book of Old MapsNovember 30, 2016, New York City – This evening Connecting.nyc Inc.’s director, Thomas Lowenhaupt, addressed a meeting of the New York Map Society urging them to join the campaign to create the Maps.nyc domain. He explained that City Hall’s actions point toward an intuitive .nyc TLD, where the city we know as New Yorkers is mapped, name-for-name, to the Internet – more or less. He stated that the likes of libraries.nyc, schools.nyc, GreenwichVillage.nyc, Harlem.nyc, and maps.nyc will be activated in the coming years to create a more intuitive and accessible city.

Thomas explained the Maps.nyc opportunity by drawing an analogy to the city’s program for licensing neighborhood domain names. In that instance the city has reserved 385 traditional neighborhood names for licensing to local nonprofit organizations, GreenwichVillage.nyc, Harlem.nyc, etc., with the license agreement having some content guidelines and a 3 year review.

He explained that beyond the neighborhood names, the Mayor’s Office of Innovation, the entity overseeing the licensing of neighborhood names, has offered the Maps.nyc domain name to pilot a process for allocating a range of “city-reserved” domain names (see list here). The criteria for licensing Maps.nyc are flexible, with the public interest and a reasonable chance of success being the leading factors.

A Collaborative Approach

Thomas invited members of the Map Society to contribute their thoughts on developing Maps.nyc via a collaborative document Connecting.nyc maintains to facilitate the creation of an application for the domain. He called it a challenging task, requiring stakeholders to step up with ideas on ownership, governance, content, design, and a business model. Questions and suggestions should be sent to [email protected]

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JacksonHeights.nyc – The Application

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Jackson Heights map for .nyc application 1aAugust 19, 2016 – Connecting.nyc Inc. today announced that it had submitted its application to the city of New York for the license to develop the JacksonHeights.nyc domain name. Accompanying the application were over 30 affidavits of support from neighborhood businesses, civic organizations, and residents. The application may be viewed here.

The application and affidavits were the result of a weeks long outreach effort aimed at informing neighborhood residents about the organization’s Jackson Heights Project and incorporating their ideas in the application.

In submitting its application Connecting.nyc explained its decision to support the project:

After extensive contact with residents and organizations of our neighborhood and careful consideration of our capabilities, we have concluded that developing a neighborhood domain name provides us with a spectacular opportunity to advance our education mission and improve the quality of life here in Jackson Heights.

Tom Lowenhaupt, founder of Connecting.nyc Inc., noted that while the comment period for the application has ended, the design for JacksonHeights.nyc will be an ongoing, open, and transparent process to which all neighborhood residents were welcome.

NOTE: Our application was approved and we’ve acquired the right to develop the JacksonHeights.nyc domain. We will hold public meetings on the development process beginning in January 2017, expecting to transition to active use in mid-2017 (The current info on the site is placeholder info entered by the city and does not reflect our plans.) Should you have questions, ideas, or an interest in engaging with the endeavor, contact [email protected]

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JacksonHeights.nyc

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Jackson Heights map for .nyc application 1aJune 16, 2016 – Connecting.nyc Inc. today announced that it was applying to the city of New York for the license to develop the JacksonHeights.nyc domain name.

The announcement was made under a clear blue sky at the annual al fresco meeting of Queens Community Board 3. The announcement represented a returning to .nyc’s roots: It was at the April 19, 2001 Community Board 3 meeting that its Internet Empowerment Resolution was approved, sparking the city’s acquisition of the .nyc TLD.

Tom Lowenhaupt, founder of Connecting.nyc Inc. and former Community Board member, stated that his organization would by applying to the city for the right to develop the JacksonHeights.nyc domain name, and that he would be working with civic groups in East Elmhurst and Corona to advance the acquisition of those names.

Comment on draft application…

Mr. Lowenhaupt noted that the application for JacksonHeights.nyc was in its final comment stage and available here. He emphasized that the thoughts of neighborhood residents were needed and most welcomed.

Affidavits of support…

Organizations and individuals were invited to formally express their support for the application by downloading an Affidavit in Support of Connecting.nyc’s license application, available here. Completed affidavits should be notarized, and returned to Connecting.nyc Inc., 35-35 75 Street, Apt. 527.

Those with questions, suggestions, or an interest in participating in JacksonHeights.nyc’s planning, operation, or governance were invited to contact Lowenhaupt at [email protected]

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Keep Our Data Local!

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IoT graphic - data out of cityMay 20, 2016, Jackson Hts., New York – Connecting.nyc Inc.’s founding director Thomas Lowenhaupt is to make a  presentation on June 8 at NYC Media Lab’s IoT Media Mash. Having seen the city play catch-up with domain names – it took 30 years for the city to get .nyc, its own TLD – he’s wondering if there’s a way Internet of Things data could be localized, and used to benefit city agencies, neighborhoods, start-ups…

Current models have IoT data flowing out of our homes, businesses, and neighborhoods to the (potential) benefit of device manufacturers and third parties such as advertisers and data brokers the chief beneficiaries of the flow. Under this model there’s little macro scale benefit for local entities.

Thomas wonders, “Must we surrender control of this data, or is there a way to keep a copy local, perhaps in a city big data cache of some sort, to be shared and developed with neighborhoods and other local interests in mind?”

Thomas’s presentation will urge the start of a “New York City Opt-in Program” that would encourage residents to share/donate their IoT data, perhaps identified by a “NYC IoT Opt-In” logo on city-friendly devices.

Localization supporters are only now gathering thoughts on specific IoT data sources which might fruitfully contributing data; and exploring for architectures that could facilitate its being copied and shared locally. Early ideas on collecting heterogeneous data from multiple contexts/devices/technologies/vendors/etc. are looking at the Hub of All Things and The Things Network as a promising points.

The value inequity of one-way flow of IoT data is characteristic of the information age, a digital equivalent to trickle-down tax policies. But at this early stage we might still have the opportunity to advocate for a city-friendly architecture that keeps it local. Looking at the June 8 event and beyond (the IoT Media Mash is still soliciting speakers), we’re soliciting ideas on how this development might take place. Luckily, in New York City we’re blessed with lots of local expertise, Beta-NY and other civic friendly entities. Let’s keep it local!

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Workshop: Empowering New York City’s Neighborhoods

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Neighborhood Preservation Center

This event’s report is now available.

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March 8, 2016, Jackson Hts., New York – The de Blasio administration has initiated a program to license operators of the 385 neighborhood domain names: Astoria.nyc, Bensonhurst.nyc, Corona.nyc, Ditmars.nyc, Egbertville.nyc, Flatbush.nyc, GreenwichVillage.nyc, Harlem.nyc…

On Tuesday, March 22 at 7 PM we’re sponsoring a workshop to review that licensing program and explore ways to connect the independent operators of these civic media centers. Here’s the agenda:

  • Update on the city’s neighborhood domain name licensing program.
  • Share experiences and expectations of license applicants.
  • Structure and Voice: What organizational structure will best enable operators of these “dotNeighborhoods” to share best practices and be represented before city and other regulatory entities? How can these operations collaborate to create open-source modules such as ad collaboratives, bulletin boards, calendars, DNS allocators, etc?

One outcome might include the formation of an Alliance of of Neighborhood Media Centers to develop principles, policy positions, and best practices.

Where: The Neighborhood Preservation Center, 232 East 11th Street
When: Tuesday, March 22, 7:00 – 8:30 PM

Light refreshments will be provided. Reserve a seat by emailing [email protected] or using our Meetup reservation page.

Can’t make it? The meeting will be recorded by our co-sponsor, the New York Internet Society.

Note: Interested in operating a neighborhood name? Begin your exploration on our beginners guide Adding Internet Mojo To Neighborhoods.

This event’s report is now available.

 

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